The Hardest Part Of Writing A Novel

More and more authors are expected to do more for their books. Promote themselves, creating networks and audiences before they publish, and of course, do some significant editing.

Editing, more commonly know as revising, is my arch nemesis. It’s the nasty reality of writing, the rude awakening that says, “you know how you slaved over your novel for the last few years to produce this draft? Yeah, you aren’t even close to being done”. Then it howls in laughter.

Okay, maybe it’s not that dramatic, but you get the idea. You finish your novel thinking you’ve done your best to have commas in the right place, eliminate the passive voice, and destroy the repetitive use of words. But, as you open the word document and begin reading you will probably do what I did when I started to read my finished draft. Groan. Sigh. Then let you head slowly fall until its rested on the desk in the realization that more work is ahead.

Now maybe you thought of it, but I didn’t. Revising, I believe, is the hardest work, work that causes you to dig even deeper into your self than a novel does.

Since I know only bits about the editing process, I do know it can be more of a refining period and much more than simply tweaking grammar. Therefore I wanted to pass on this video about refining your work and tips from a very good blog WritingIsHardWork.

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4 thoughts on “The Hardest Part Of Writing A Novel

  1. brickwallviews

    Bizarrely, I actually like rewriting / refining / reworking / editing – though I must admit that when you get to the stage of taking a comma out, putting it in again, it tends to drive even the most strong-minded person a bit crazy.

    1. That is true. I usually end of missing the forest for the trees and vice versa when I am trying to slog through my drafts. Do you have any tips or recommendations on revising, proofreading, or editing a work?

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